Amazon Video

BUILDING NEW OLD STOCK ELECTRONIC KITS – PAIA 5700 DRUM Synthesizer

building NEW OLD STOCK PAIA DRUM 5700 KITS
if you’d like to see more videos on this project and much much more, including samples from this machine and a full 4 hour video of me building it. check and support here :- https://www.patreon.com/lookmumnocomputer
or you can use the super thanks button below the video!
it also makes @THIS MUSEUM IS (NOT) OBSOLETE get bigger and better. 🙂
————
THIS MUSEUM IS (NOT) OBSOLETE open hour info and more :-
https://this-museum-is-not-obsolete.com/
——-
MODULAR PERFECTION FOR ALL YOUR SYNTH WOODWORK NEEDS :-
https://modularperfection.com/
——-
PAIA 5700 BUILD DOCUMENTATION
https://paia.com/talk/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=800
the above was found after i assembled the first kit, it answers a lot of the questions i had.
PAIA https://paia.com/
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VIDEO LOOKING THROUGH THE SCHEMATIC :-

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I got this from Vito on Facebook synth sales and trades. Great seller! Turned up quick and easy.
he has a reverb shop https://reverb.com/shop/papa-ls-beats-and-sounds
————
THANKUS HUMUNGOUSO to :-
Arnix T-Bone
Vaz Daqui
Eric Painter
Jason Kuehl
Aaron Ritter
David Boudreau
Claudio
Roland G. McIntosh
casey
CoFFeeTaBLesE
worldofchris
David Dolphin
Matt Followell (PDP-7)
Miles Flavel
————-
if you want to donate to the electronic component fund! Paypal :-
https://www.paypal.me/lookmumnocomputer
————-
DISCORD :- https://discord.gg/UjKQqAaf
SPOTIFY :- http://bit.ly/LMNCSpotify
Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/LOOKMUMNOCOMPUTER
Website :- https://www.lookmumnocomputer.com
Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/lookmumnocomputer/

#building #howto #synthesizer

Amazon Video

The History Of Electronic Drums Part 1: The First Electric Drum Sets

How did electronic drums become a ‘thing’? Did someone invent them in their basement? Did a fairy drum-mother float down from the sky to bless us all with a kit we could use for quiet home practice, out-of-the-box effects and pre-EQed studio sounds?

You used to only be able to get rhythmic drum samples by playing a keyboard or pushing buttons on a synthesizer – not by striking a surface with a drumstick. That’s where the real magic happened.

It took nearly 50 years of innovation to get to where electronic drums are today: not just an alternative to acoustic kits, but an incredible instrument in itself.

This is the first part in a four-part documentary series on the history of electronic drums, and we hate to leave you hanging. So if you want to see the rest of this documentary series, try Drumeo free for 7 days and get access to The History Of Electronic Drums, other drum videos and courses, live Q&As, song tutorials and more! Claim your free trial here: https://drumeo.com/7-day-trial/

Chapters:
00:00 – Introduction
01:42 – Early 20th Century Developments
02:41 – Late 1960s – Hollywood Meazzi Tronicdrum
04:14 – Behind The Tronicdrum President
05:16 – Tronicdrum Innovations
05:31 – The 1970s – The Influence Of Synths & Rock
06:35 – Pollard Syndrums
09:30 – Behind The Model 477 Pollard Syndrums
11:26 – Syndrum Innovations
12:29 – Star Instruments Synare
14:45 – Behind The Synare 3
16:09 – Synare Tympani
16:59 – Synare Innovations
17:31 – Part II Preview

_______________________________________________________
►Learn Drums Here: https://drumeo.com/
►Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
►Our Favorite Music Products: https://www.drumeo.com/jared-recommends/
_______________________________________________________

Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/
►TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drumeoofficial
_______________________________________________________

#edrums #documentary #drumeo

Amazon Video

The History Of Electronic Drums Part 1: The First Electric Drum Sets

How did electronic drums become a ‘thing’? Did someone invent them in their basement? Did a fairy drum-mother float down from the sky to bless us all with a kit we could use for quiet home practice, out-of-the-box effects and pre-EQed studio sounds?

You used to only be able to get rhythmic drum samples by playing a keyboard or pushing buttons on a synthesizer – not by striking a surface with a drumstick. That’s where the real magic happened.

It took nearly 50 years of innovation to get to where electronic drums are today: not just an alternative to acoustic kits, but an incredible instrument in itself.

This is the first part in a four-part documentary series on the history of electronic drums, and we hate to leave you hanging. So if you want to see the rest of this documentary series, try Drumeo free for 7 days and get access to The History Of Electronic Drums, other drum videos and courses, live Q&As, song tutorials and more! Claim your free trial here: https://drumeo.com/7-day-trial/

Chapters:
00:00 – Introduction
01:42 – Early 20th Century Developments
02:41 – Late 1960s – Hollywood Meazzi Tronicdrum
04:14 – Behind The Tronicdrum President
05:16 – Tronicdrum Innovations
05:31 – The 1970s – The Influence Of Synths & Rock
06:35 – Pollard Syndrums
09:30 – Behind The Model 477 Pollard Syndrums
11:26 – Syndrum Innovations
12:29 – Star Instruments Synare
14:45 – Behind The Synare 3
16:09 – Synare Tympani
16:59 – Synare Innovations
17:31 – Part II Preview

_______________________________________________________
►Learn Drums Here: https://drumeo.com/
►Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
►Our Favorite Music Products: https://www.drumeo.com/jared-recommends/
_______________________________________________________

Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/
►TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drumeoofficial
_______________________________________________________

#edrums #documentary #drumeo

Amazon Video

A Beginner’s Guide To Electronic Drums

Electronic drum sets are all the rage. They won’t break your back. Your neighbors won’t call the cops on you. And unlike tuning acoustic drums, you can change how they sound with the push of a button.

This 15-minute crash course on electronic drums shows you how to choose the right e-kit and how to get the most of it once you own one.

0:00 – Intro
0:44 – Choosing an electronic drum set
Should you buy a new or used kit? New kits tend to work the best, include the newest technology and, like phones and computers, are sometimes less expensive than earlier models when they were first released.

If you’re looking into used electronic drum sets, consider its age and the generation of the technology. If it’s over 10 years old, you’ll get old tech that might not give you the best playing or connectivity experience.

5:09 – Choosing headphones/speakers
When choosing the right headphones, make sure you get a pair that are comfortable, and with a closed back design. Don’t use cheap Bluetooth enabled headphones or ear buds (especially not AirPods). That latency will drive you nuts.

If you’d prefer to use a speaker or want others to hear your kit’s audio, make sure you use something with full range support. Bass amps are perfect for electronic drum kits. Avoid guitar amps as they’re built for distortion and they’re too mid-range heavy. Roland, Alesis, and Simmons all make dedicated electronic amps for drums if you want to go that route.

Our tip: get in-ear monitors. They fit in your ears like ear buds and sound great!

8:33 – Setting up
Follow the instructions that came with your kit, or look for a downloadable manual online if you bought it used. When it comes to where you should set up, there’s one important thing about electronic drums you need to know right off the bat; even though you’re wearing headphones, your neighbors or someone else at home sure will hear you — especially if you share a wall.

Set up the drums on a carpet to add a layer of dampening. But if it’s too plush, the kit won’t be as stable and might shake or move. You can pick up a 4’x6′ rubber-backed floor mat with a low pile at your local hardware store.

13:13 – Start recording
While it can take some pricey equipment and time to capture your performance on an acoustic kit, electronic kits are usually plug and play – no mixing or editing required! Filming and recording is a great way to track your progress or share your playing with your drum teacher, friends, or social media community.

Any entry level audio interface like a Behringer UCA222 or an iRig 2 will do the trick. Just make sure the interface is class compliant so you’re good to go right away.

16:11 – Outro
And there you have it – ‘Electronic Drums For Drummies’! Dive deeper and check out more tips to get the most out of your kit in this Beat article:
►https://www.drumeo.com/beat/quick-guide-to-electronic-drums/

And if you’re new to drumming and this is your first e-kit, you might also want to check out this comprehensive guide to buying electronic drums in 2021:
►https://www.drumeo.com/beat/the-ultimate-guide-to-buying-electronic-drums/

_______________________________________________________
►Learn Drums Here: https://drumeo.com/
►Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
►Our Favorite Music Products: https://www.drumeo.com/jared-recommends/
_______________________________________________________
Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/
►TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drumeoofficial
_______________________________________________________

#edrums #drumlesson #drumeo

Amazon Video

A Beginner’s Guide To Electronic Drums

Electronic drum sets are all the rage. They won’t break your back. Your neighbors won’t call the cops on you. And unlike tuning acoustic drums, you can change how they sound with the push of a button.

This 15-minute crash course on electronic drums shows you how to choose the right e-kit and how to get the most of it once you own one.

0:00 – Intro
0:44 – Choosing an electronic drum set
Should you buy a new or used kit? New kits tend to work the best, include the newest technology and, like phones and computers, are sometimes less expensive than earlier models when they were first released.

If you’re looking into used electronic drum sets, consider its age and the generation of the technology. If it’s over 10 years old, you’ll get old tech that might not give you the best playing or connectivity experience.

5:09 – Choosing headphones/speakers
When choosing the right headphones, make sure you get a pair that are comfortable, and with a closed back design. Don’t use cheap Bluetooth enabled headphones or ear buds (especially not AirPods). That latency will drive you nuts.

If you’d prefer to use a speaker or want others to hear your kit’s audio, make sure you use something with full range support. Bass amps are perfect for electronic drum kits. Avoid guitar amps as they’re built for distortion and they’re too mid-range heavy. Roland, Alesis, and Simmons all make dedicated electronic amps for drums if you want to go that route.

Our tip: get in-ear monitors. They fit in your ears like ear buds and sound great!

8:33 – Setting up
Follow the instructions that came with your kit, or look for a downloadable manual online if you bought it used. When it comes to where you should set up, there’s one important thing about electronic drums you need to know right off the bat; even though you’re wearing headphones, your neighbors or someone else at home sure will hear you — especially if you share a wall.

Set up the drums on a carpet to add a layer of dampening. But if it’s too plush, the kit won’t be as stable and might shake or move. You can pick up a 4’x6′ rubber-backed floor mat with a low pile at your local hardware store.

13:13 – Start recording
While it can take some pricey equipment and time to capture your performance on an acoustic kit, electronic kits are usually plug and play – no mixing or editing required! Filming and recording is a great way to track your progress or share your playing with your drum teacher, friends, or social media community.

Any entry level audio interface like a Behringer UCA222 or an iRig 2 will do the trick. Just make sure the interface is class compliant so you’re good to go right away.

16:11 – Outro
And there you have it – ‘Electronic Drums For Drummies’! Dive deeper and check out more tips to get the most out of your kit in this Beat article:
►https://www.drumeo.com/beat/quick-guide-to-electronic-drums/

And if you’re new to drumming and this is your first e-kit, you might also want to check out this comprehensive guide to buying electronic drums in 2021:
►https://www.drumeo.com/beat/the-ultimate-guide-to-buying-electronic-drums/

_______________________________________________________
►Learn Drums Here: https://drumeo.com/
►Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
►Our Favorite Music Products: https://www.drumeo.com/jared-recommends/
_______________________________________________________
Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/
►TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drumeoofficial
_______________________________________________________

#edrums #drumlesson #drumeo

Amazon Video

Super-Rare Electronic Drum Set (Unboxing Video)

Learn Drums Here: https://www.drumeo.com/
Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
Our Favorite Music ProductsL https://drumeo.com/gear

Think of resting down on your all new, advanced digital drum kit, fan gently caressing your freshly-teased hair, acid-washed pants bright versus the smooth black of the geometric pads. Somewhere in the distance, you hear echoes of “Born In The USA”.

Well, it’s not 1985 any longer, and his hair isn’t teased, however in this video clip Jared Falk unboxes a barely-used TAMA Techstar package and takes it for an examination drive!

Made in Japan, this vintage package is still in its initial boxes, plastic as well as styrofoam. Digital drums were created in the late ’70s (you might acknowledge the hexagonal pads of the Simmons SDSV) and truly got popularity in the ’80s, so this Techstar was born throughout digital drumming’s prime.

It is composed of 4 TSP100 pads as well as a kick pad, with round surface areas on square pads (proceeding the geometric pad trend that started in the 70s).

What far better means to get initial 1980s electronic examples than to use an original kit from the 1980s?

The component lets you adjust degeneration, tone as well as strike, as well as additionally has handles for bend and also sound– straightforward as well as nice. This kit doesn’t featured cymbal pads, a bass drum pedal or throne, so Jared added real cymbals.

The samples we have on modern electronic packages can be quite sensible, as well as the examples on the ’85 Techstar noise very dated by today’s requirements, however it offers you an idea of a high technology drumming option from the prime time of digital drum noises in music. When you play it, you’ll appear like a drum maker!

Click the web link below to download a retro loop track that you can jam along to:

For even more unboxings and also specs of contemporary digital packages, watch the videos in Drumeo Edge!

Follow us:
► The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
► Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
► Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/

Amazon Video

Super-Rare Electronic Drum Set (Unboxing Video)

Learn Drums Here: https://www.drumeo.com/
Free Lessons: https://drumeo.com/free-lessons
Our Favorite Music ProductsL https://drumeo.com/gear

Imagine sitting down on your brand new, state-of-the-art electronic drum kit, fan gently caressing your freshly-teased hair, acid-washed jeans bright against the sleek black of the geometric pads. Somewhere in the distance, you hear echoes of “Born In The USA”.

Well, it’s not 1985 anymore, and his hair isn’t teased, but in this video Jared Falk unboxes a barely-used TAMA Techstar kit and takes it for a test drive!

Made in Japan, this vintage kit is still in its original boxes, plastic and styrofoam. Electronic drums were invented in the late ’70s (you may recognize the hexagonal pads of the Simmons SDSV) and really gained popularity in the ’80s, so this Techstar was born during electronic drumming’s prime.

It consists of four TSP100 pads and a kick pad, with circular surfaces on square pads (continuing the geometric pad trend that started in the 70s).

What better way to get original 1980s electronic samples than to use an original kit from the 1980s?

The module lets you adjust tone, attack and decay, and also has knobs for bend and noise – nice and simple. This kit doesn’t come with cymbal pads, a bass drum pedal or throne, so Jared added real cymbals.

The samples we have on modern electronic kits can be pretty realistic, and the samples on the ’85 Techstar sound extremely dated by today’s standards, but it gives you an idea of a high tech drumming option from the heyday of electronic drum sounds in music. You’ll sound like a drum machine when you play it!

Click the link below to download a retro loop track that you can jam along to:

For more unboxings and specs of modern electronic kits, watch the videos in Drumeo Edge!

Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/

Amazon Video

8 Tips For Playing Electronic Drums

Reach Your Drumming Goals HERE:
https://www.Drumeo.com

Greater than 50% of brand-new drums sold are digital drums. They’re portable, they’re silent, as well as whether you’re utilizing them as your primary instrument or to practice when you’re away from your acoustic set, they’re amazing for learning, practicing, gigging and also videotaping.

If you’re just beginning to play digital drums, below are some suggestions to consider:

1. Obtain a great pair of earphones
Regular earbuds can interrupt the experience by not shutting out enough outside sound. An excellent set of earphones or in-ear displays is well worth the financial investment.

2. Find out exactly how to make use of the component
As opposed to opting for the sounds ‘right out package’, look and also read the manual for video walkthroughs. See what others are doing with their component to tailor and get most from it so it’s a better fit for you and also your having fun style.

3. Usage nylon-tipped sticks
While different tip products and forms can transform the method things sound on an acoustic set as well as steel cymbals, they don’t impact the noise on a digital package. However if your pads have mesh heads, take into consideration using nylon pointers as wooden tips can harm the mesh if they splinter.

4. Utilize a plastic or timber beater
Some individuals find that really felt beaters can put on out a mesh bass drum head quicker, so you might intend to use a plastic or timber beater rather.

5. Understand your characteristics
For those who want to relocate back and forth from playing an electronic set to playing on an acoustic set, maintain dynamic arm or leg independence in mind. If you’re made use of to exercising on pads and also wish to boost the quantity on one drum or cymbal, all you have to do is raise the quantity. When you move to an acoustic set, as an example, you may finish up playing the hi-hat or snare as well loud. Attempt utilizing just one side of your headphones and listen to just how hard or soft you actually struck the rubber pads as well as improve your playing from there.

6. Be aware of how various an electronic kit really feels
You’ll discover there’s a various rebound on a digital pad contrasted to an acoustic drum. Most pads will certainly really feel the exact same from one to an additional, however an acoustic entrapment drum and also acoustic toms will not have as much rebound as each other, or as much rebound, duration. You might notice that you ‘appear’ and ‘play’ better on the electronic kit. If you’ll be using both so you do not obtain obsequious, keep that in mind!

7. See to it you know exactly how to tune acoustic drums
If you’re utilized to simply activating a component and having your toms already seem terrific, and after that you choose that you wish to additionally play acoustic drums, you ought to create your ear as well as method tuning. You’re mosting likely to have an extremely different experience on an acoustic kit– where you can not change the sound with the push of a button.

8. Be mindful of spacing between the pads
You’ll observe that digital kits are usually extra compact as well as have much less area between each drum if you’re switching in between digital as well as acoustic drums. Set up your electronic package with spacing that matches your acoustic package to give you a less complicated shift.

Electronic drums aren’t just making drumming much more accessible for more people– they can likewise provide you with endless choices as your primary kit. Make it your very own!

Follow us:
► The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
► Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
► Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/

Amazon Video

8 Tips For Playing Electronic Drums

Reach Your Drumming Goals HERE:
https://www.Drumeo.com

More than 50% of new drums sold are electronic drums. They’re compact, they’re quiet, and whether you’re using them as your primary instrument or to practice when you’re away from your acoustic kit, they’re amazing for learning, rehearsing, gigging and recording.

If you’re just starting to play electronic drums, here are some tips to consider:

1. Get a good pair of headphones
Normal earbuds can disrupt the experience by not blocking out enough external noise. A good pair of headphones or in-ear monitors is well worth the investment.

2. Learn how to use the module
Instead of settling for the sounds ‘right out the box’, read the manual and look for video walkthroughs. See what others are doing with their module to customize and get most out of it so it’s a better fit for you and your playing style.

3. Use nylon-tipped sticks
While different tip materials and shapes can change the way things sound on an acoustic kit and metal cymbals, they don’t impact the sound on an electronic kit. But if your pads have mesh heads, consider using nylon tips as wooden tips could damage the mesh if they splinter.

4. Use a plastic or wood beater
Some people find that felt beaters can wear out a mesh bass drum head faster, so you might want to use a plastic or wood beater instead.

5. Be aware of your dynamics
For those who want to move back and forth from playing an electronic kit to playing on an acoustic kit, keep dynamic limb independence in mind. If you’re used to practicing on pads and want to increase the volume on one drum or cymbal, all you have to do is increase the volume. But when you move to an acoustic kit, as an example, you might end up playing the hi-hat or snare too loud. Try using just one side of your headphones and listen to how hard or soft you actually hit the rubber pads and refine your playing from there.

6. Be aware of how different an electronic kit feels
You’ll notice there’s a different rebound on an electronic pad compared to an acoustic drum. Most pads will feel the same from one to another, but an acoustic snare drum and acoustic toms won’t have as much rebound as each other, or as much rebound, period. You might notice that you ‘sound’ and ‘play’ better on the electronic kit. Keep that in mind if you’ll be using both so you don’t get complacent!

7. Make sure you know how to tune acoustic drums
If you’re used to just turning on a module and having your toms already sound great, and then you decide that you want to also play acoustic drums, you should develop your ear and practice tuning. You’re going to have a very different experience on an acoustic kit – where you can’t change the sound with the push of a button.

8. Be aware of spacing between the pads
If you’re switching between electronic and acoustic drums, you’ll notice that electronic kits are typically more compact and have less space between each drum. Set up your electronic kit with spacing that matches your acoustic kit to give you an easier transition.

Electronic drums aren’t only making drumming more accessible for more people – they can also provide you with endless options as your primary kit. Make it your own!

Follow us:
►The Drumeo Beat: https://www.drumeo.com/beat/
►Facebook: http://facebook.com/drumeo/
►Instagram: http://instagram.com/drumeoofficial/

Uncategorized

How (and why) to use ELECTRONICS in your setup

What can we (drummers) do with electronics? How might we incorporate them into music? Are electronics “artificial” or even “soul-less”? I discuss this (and more) while on tour with Tunisian singer Emel Mathlouthi.

Listen to Emel Mathlouthi’s music:
○ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2GGhfTN
○ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/emelmathlouthipro

Watch these live performances we did in Amman, Jordan last year:
‘Dfina’: http://youtu.be/1jjkFpbBWHI
‘Kaddech’: http://youtu.be/NuiumYL3Ut4

Background music (my band Sungazer):
○ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2sdTSJ5
○ iTunes: https://apple.co/2LUckPT
○ Facebook: https://bit.ly/2UtZFai

Follow me on Insta:
https://www.instagram.com/shawncrowder/